‘Fred Dibnah And David Hall – Age Of Steam’

‘Fred Dibnah And David Hall – Age Of Steam’: (2003 – BBC Books)

I bought the book last week, or so, ago from W.H. Smith’s. Reduced, or I’d not have bought it, but I’m glad I did. (No longer stocked)

I’ve only read the beginning so far. However it spells out the methods of power that were used to power the industrial revolution so well.

From:

Water Wheel: With it’s water buckets filling and emptying to turn the wheel and drive the machines.

Steam: With it’s piston action powered by steam and a vacuum filling and emptying to drive the machines.

Internal Combustion Engine: With it’s compression and fuel ignition driven pistons driving a crank shaft, to drive almost anything.

Electric Motor: With it’s shaft driven by electricity in exactly the same method as a water wheel.

Apart from the obvious, what do they all have in common?

They require/d expensive fuels to turn them.

Fred Dibnah and David Hall made the point that the first steam engine used in the coal mines to pump water out of the mines required tons of coal a day to operate. No problem for coal mines, but it took James Watt to come along later, and make them more efficient, before they were viable for other applications.

All power should be free. “Thine will be done on earth as it is in heaven ” includes endless supplies of free power, I’m certain.

It is certainly true that we must at least try to create a free power source.

Steam and water wheels were often used together. With steam pumping the water back for reuse. Hydro Electric is often made that way. Water powering the turbines by day, and the electricity pumping the water back at night for reuse when demand for power is much less. (In the book, because I didn’t know that)

It is almost in my mind how to put all the elements of the past to use as a free power source. Required Power. Can you?

There is an equation you know from the above, and it’s basically simple.

‘ The power used to drive a wheel could be got from the wheel itself if the initial input were immediately and efficiently reused. ‘

For Example: If an electric motor had power points all the way around the drive wheel, which put power in, and at the same time gave power off. In equal amounts it would not deliver enough power to use for driving it, but supposing, just for the sake of easy maths, only four points on the wheel were used to drive it, but Fifty Six were used to gather power to be used again. The equation could be any number of either within the circumference of a circle. (Of course you could have more points side by side. Thus doubling both input and output)

I’ve based that on the seconds on a clock. Inputs at twelve, fifteen, thirty, and forty five. 

Outputs between = Fifty Six. The most efficient could be totally different. E.g. Inputs could = twelve. Outputs = 48. (Also a clock face example may not be the best spacing)

Input and output need not be on the same wheel, but if they could be, motor size would be greatly reduced, and repair would be a simple wheel replacement.

Anyway:

Good Luck with that. Put it in a Porsche and complete a 24 hour race. No need to win it, first time.

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About gdicm

At present I am disabled (Leprosy)
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